Rail News

MTA Assess Hurricane Sandy Damage To Transportation System

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, thousands of New York City Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) workers inspected the entire system and to asses the damage and begin repair operations.

The massively destructive storm, one of the most powerful in history, affected service throughout the MTA service region causing electric power loss on the Metro-North Railroad from 59th Street to Croton-Harmon on the Hudson Line and east to New Haven on the New Haven Line. West Side Yards on the Long Island Rail Road also sustained damage and two East River tunnels were flooded.

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced news earlier today confirming that five of the MTA’s seven bridges had been fully inspected and re-opened at noon. The Robert  F. Kennedy, Verrazano-Narrows, Bronx-Whitestone, Throgs Neck and Henry Hudson bridges all passed inspection and deemed safe. The two Rockaway bridges, Cross Bay Veterans Memorial and Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges bridges, along with the Hugh L. Carey and Queens Midtown Tunnel still remain closed.

Subway Tunnels Flooded

Flooding also caused major damage to many bridges and tunnels. The Hugh L. Carey Tunnel flooded from end to end and the Queens Midtown Tunnel took on water. Downtown Manhattan experienced extremely heavy damage where several subway lines converge. The South Ferry station along with several other subway tunnels are completely filled with water. The MTA and its operating agencies have begun the lengthy process of assessment and repair but it’s too early to say how long it will take to restore the system to full service.

MTA Chairman, Joseph J. Lhota inspected many of the hardest hit areas and said “Our transportation system has never faced a disaster as devastating Hurricane Sandy, which has caused an unparalleled level of damage. The challenge that we face now is one of assessment, inspection, repair, and restoration. This will not be a short process, but it will be one that puts safety as its major focus.”
Repairing the damage to the 6200 subway cars, 600 miles of tracks and 468 subway stations along with the hundreds of miles of track, switches, railroad crossing and cars and locomotives will be exhaustive and time-consuming with the MTA working to the limit to return safe and efficient service to it’s 8.5 million daily customers.

Bronx-Whitestone, Throgs Neck and Henry Hudson bridges all passed inspection and deemed safe. The two Rockaway bridges, Cross Bay Veterans Memorial and Marine Parkway-Gil Hodges bridges, along with the Hugh L. Carey and Queens Midtown Tunnel still remain closed.

Subway Tunnels Flooded

Flooding also caused major damage to many bridges and tunnels. The Hugh L. Carey Tunnel flooded from end to end and the Queens Midtown Tunnel took on water. Downtown Manhattan experienced extremely heavy damage where several subway lines converge. The South Ferry station along with several other subway tunnels are completely filled with water. The MTA and its operating agencies have begun the lengthy process of assessment and repair but it's too early to say how long it will take to restore the system to full service.

MTA Chairman, Joseph J. Lhota inspected many of the hardest hit areas and said “Our transportation system has never faced a disaster as devastating Hurricane Sandy, which has caused an unparalleled level of damage. The challenge that we face now is one of assessment, inspection, repair, and restoration. This will not be a short process, but it will be one that puts safety as its major focus.”
Repairing the damage to the 6200 subway cars, 600 miles of tracks and 468 subway stations along with the hundreds of miles of track, switches, railroad crossing and cars and locomotives will be exhaustive and time-consuming with the MTA working to the limit to return safe and efficient service to it's 8.5 million daily customers.

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